Welcome in

A room to feed your

Since 2013 a wide open door 

for curious and hungry eyes

ONEROOM is a little cozy place totally devoted to contemporary photography located in Piazza dei Satiri 55, just in the heart of the heart of Rome.
Half a bookstore, half a library, with a bit of a gallery and a studio, our aim is to promote knowledge through and about the so-called “photobooks”.

Our selection of new, uncommon and rare books span between seminal masterpieces since the sixties to new self-published hidden gems yet to discover, from all over the world.
Not only a boutique for collectors, but a place to be inspired and feel how does it look the world as seen by someone else.

We love to host meaningful events

mostly in a dialogical, co-curated form

on relevant topics and relationships between arts, politics and sciences.

What we can do for you

Bookstore

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Library

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Research

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Experiences

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Curatorial services

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Talks, Lectures and Formation

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We are open

From Tuesday to Saturday,
4 to 7 pm
by chance or by appointment

+39 338 7229120

Address Piazza dei Satiri 55
00186 Rome, Italy

Email oneroom.books@gmail.com

FAQ

Most frequent questions and answers

I think that the bookseller is an ambiguous job, somewhere in between culture and commerce, and personally I see myself more like a cultural operator than a trader.

The reasons that led me to venture on this path with Mandeep Photography in 2008 are very different from those that led to the birth of ONEROOM in 2013, and are still another thing than those that allow me today to open the door daily.

Contributing to creating a community of enthusiasts and a creative platform from below, in which the photo book was one of the glues.

A place to share, to offer new visions to a city that I felt gloomy and depressed: an invitation to reopen eyes and heart, finding new light and inspiration among the pages of a book.

ONEROOM, at least in its current form, it’s a kind of meeting point and conversational space, a hybrid between a bookstore and a library, where I try to preserve a last consultation copy of some of the more important photobooks published in the last sixty years as well as small new hidden gems by micro-publishing houses or self-published materials.

ONEROOM is also the space I use as a studio, and the privileged position in the center of the center of Rome allows me to meet the most diverse people from every corner of the world, passionate and professional but above all simple curious passersby who have never even considered that photography could peep into their lives.

Many of the books that I keep here are tools that I use, hooking of attention, conversation ideas, access keys that allow me to introduce people from the most different backgrounds and personalities in a new world.

What interests me is the environment in which I live, this World, and the interactions that develop between the 7 billion people who live with me at this time. Photography (to me) is now the best tool created by man to teach himself education and respect for the legitimacy of someone else’s point of view.

I’ll explain.

Over a century and a half of history we have already seen countless struggles on the “true” meaning and role of photography, endless and unsolvable disputes that have produced nothing but divisions. Artistic photography vs amateur photography vs photojournalism vs black and white photography vs color photography vs analog photography vs digital photography vs smartphones etc. until splitting into subatomic particles of ourselves.

I am more committed to finding a common ground for all these and other practices. From the photograph that I call “conscious” or “authorial” to the professional one, from our snapshots of birthdays and holidays to those images produced by devices that are not cameras, nor are they necessarily operated by humans, such as microscopes or telescopes or surveillance camera to name a few.

Photography considered like a fragment of time and space that for some reason attracts our attention, “tells us” something; that we decide to isolate from the flow and preserve for ourselves or share with others.

This possibility, up until a decade ago, was reserved only for buyers of a specific, more or less expensive equipment, which was used to do only that, “only” to take pictures.

Today a tool that allows you to take pictures is integrated into many objects that are already part of our daily life, which we buy and use for different purposes, but which allow us to make videos and photos, share them with others and observe those produced by others.

An epochal revolution!

Which has opened the doors of photography to a vastly wider audience, making now more than two-thirds of the world’s potential photographers.

In this avalanche of images that overwhelms us every day (see the installation of Erik Kessels 24 hours in photos at the Foam in Amsterdam in 2011) both the author and the amateur images converge, in an ecosystem that tends to break down and decontextualize , untying the photograph from the motif of its very existence and offering the other end of the thread in the eyes of the spectator, who will relocate and recontextualize it within his own personal life experience.

From the bottom of my heart I hope that the next epochal revolution is when we stop considering these images necessarily as the result of some kind of authorship, (and therefore the competition, I’m a better photographer, my photos are better than yours, my lens is longest… ) and we will begin to accept the hypothesis that the same piece of the world that we live and see in our own way, radicalizing our beliefs or disbeliefs more and more, can be legitimately seen from different perspectives, enriching our vocabulary of experiences and points of view, useful tools to better face every challenge that everyday life places on us.

Bringing us magically to a world that is more empathetic and open to respecting for others.

Fred Ritchin recently stated that “The photo books are going through a golden age, but the concern is that we are doing them for each other” referring to those in charge of work or to people who are involved in various ways in photography.

I can only agree with Ritchin, my personal ten-year experience returns exactly the same picture. But I believe it is necessary to overcome this closure towards a wider and more varied public.

In the last ten years, I have seen hundreds of initiatives related to photography explode and flourish, from associations to schools to festivals and fairs. Real and virtual networks. An audience of enthusiasts grown exponentially, a galaxy of ever-expanding micro-mini publishing houses. Boundless and unstoppable production.

But, most of these new fans are passionate mainly by their own photographs rather than by the consumption of other’s pics: they are already, they are becoming or want to become insiders. And as such, they have, or seek, a direct relationship with the authors of reference even in the wonderful circumstance in which they manifest the desire to buy a book. They move in the same context, they meet and know each other, they are part of the same community, and in this case, the figure of the bookseller as an intermediary or bridge between different communities makes little sense.